The Wonders of a Travel Guide

The world has become so fast and any information can be simply processed on to your finger tips and also in front of you with the advent of telecommunication and internet. Travel books seem to be of a yesteryear’s category. Today you can get information about the destination and other necessary packing details about a particular destination through internet and also through various travel guides which available complimentary at the location.

Sometimes the internet might not provide with exact information and if you are visiting a destination which does not support any connection then these travel guides come very handy. They provide you with brief knowledge about the place and also provide you with list of do’s and don’ts that you should keep in mind when traveling to a particular destination.

The entire location map and transport means to reach to that location is also provided in the free travel guides. These guides are like pamphlet form with brief information but is sufficient to decide whether you want to go to that particular destination or not. All kinds of information regarding food, accommodation, transport and taxi service information is all provided in these maps. The size of these maps are very appropriate and are folded in such a manner that can be stored and carried easily without adding burden to tour back.

The travel guides are forever and can help you in greatly in some crisis situation. For instance, if you are trekking in the middle of a forest and you suddenly realize that you have lost your way, but checking on I phone will be of no use as you might not have the network in such remote locations. Then these travel guides come handy which have direction and also ways to reach the nearest information center. These travel guides can also be of great souvenirs that you can retain forever.

Tourism has increased to a great level and is expected that by 2020 around 1.5 billion people will travel every year. But with the rise of tourism the traveler has also become very smart and travel with planned itinerary and goals. Responsible tourism has increased and as the world has become global village and so have the standards risen in recent past. To encourage tourism in your country free travel guides is just one way to promote and advertise the positive things about your country/city. In fact it’s through these guides that tourists and foreigners can get real information about a particular location.

For Consultants

Travel is a fact of life for most consultants. Many spend 45 weeks on the road every year, and some say they wouldn’t want it any other way.

We know one married couple where both are traveling consultants. They often joke that they should write a book called “Marriage on Three Days a Week” because they only see each other from Thursday night to Sunday night most weeks. Of course, they take great vacations with all the frequent flier miles and hotel points, and neither one is left at home to manage the household while the other dines in restaurants every night and comes home expecting all the chores to be done.

Like many others, they have learned how to be comfortable on the road so that their travel schedules are a source of new experiences and great stories instead of a hardship. If you learn how to be comfortable in your environment, you’ll do better work and last longer in this demanding field.

There are two types of consulting roles, from a travel schedule perspective. One type of consultant is the real Road Warrior who is in a different city each week, often visiting two or three different clients and staying only a couple of days each place. The other type travels to the same destination every week to work on a long-term engagement over several months. Which type of travel schedule you end up with depends as much on your personality as on your skill set.

No matter which type of travel schedule you have, there are some seemingly small things you can do to make yourself significantly more comfortable on the road.

Enroll in every frequent flier and hotel points program you can. The biggest perks in business travel come when you get a free family vacation later. All those trips to Pittsburgh might buy you a trip to Honolulu or Prague or wherever your heart leads you.

Whenever possible, use the same airline and hotel chain for every city. This helps you rack up the points faster, and it also establishes a level of comfort and familiarity for you from the moment you arrive in the city. Not every Marriott is exactly like every other Marriott, but there are enough similarities between them that you will begin to feel at home quickly.

Packing for Travel

Develop a routine for packing. Make a checklist that includes everything that you know you’ll need for any trip, including items like toothbrush and cell-phone charger. Go over the checklist every single time you pack a suitcase.

If you don’t follow this advice, you will eventually end up spending $200 on a “charge everything” device and using a hotel toothbrush that will rip your gums out.

  1. Always assume you will have to carry your luggage yourself. If you aren’t sure you will need it, don’t take it. You can always buy one there. (Don’t accept engagements in locations that don’t have stores.)
  2. Pack something comfortable to wear in your hotel room and clothes you can wear to work out.
  3. Plan to sleep in something you don’t mind being seen wearing in public. In the event of a fire, hotels will evacuate two floors above and two floors below, even if it’s just a small fire in a trash basket. That’s what that loudspeaker above the bed is for.
  4. All luggage looks alike. Make your bag easy to spot on the carousel and less likely to be stolen with a few strategically placed strips of duct tape or a big pink bow.
  5. The military knows that rolled clothing does not wrinkle. Don’t fold it, roll it. Turn jackets inside out, fold the collar up and press one shoulder inside the other.
  6. Think about what you pack from the perspective of Customs and Airport Security. For example, many airlines will not allow you to carry steel-tipped darts in your carry-on luggage. (Yes, one of us learned this the hard way. Not the one you think.) Carry all medication in the original packages, particularly prescription medication.
  7. Purchase two of everything you use daily, like cosmetics, razors, toothbrush, etc. Leave one set at home. Pack toiletries once and leave them packed. This way, you don’t have to worry that you forgot something essential and will not notice until the middle of the night in a strange hotel room. When you run out of something on the road, replace it. (This is easier if you use common brands that are sold nationally.)

After only a few weeks of travel, you’ll know exactly what you need to pack and what you don’t.

Hotel Living

If you are traveling to the same city every week, pick a hotel that you are comfortable in and make friends with the people at the front desk and in Housekeeping. If you can commit to a certain number of weeks, they might even give you a break on the room rate, which is also good for your customer.

Once you’ve tried two or three different rooms in different parts of the hotel, you’ll begin to identify specific things you like or dislike. Within a few weeks, you’ll probably have a favorite room. Don’t be afraid to ask for it every week. Staying in the same room every week can increase your sense of comfort and it’s easier to remember what room you are in. Every one of us has been frustrated at least once by trying to open a hotel room door, only to realize that the key doesn’t work because this is the room we were in last week, and we have no idea what room we have been assigned this week.

If you followed our instructions for packing and bought duplicates of all your toiletries and travel needs, you can check a suitcase with the bellman over the weekend instead of carrying it home with you. Leave your laundry with a dry cleaner over the weekend and come back on Monday to a fresh wardrobe without carrying a bag with you to the airport. That’s freedom!

Make friends with the people who have control of the food. If you are eating all your meals off the Room Service menu, you will soon get bored with the choices. Encourage the person who answers the Room Service line to give you suggestions.

When Christine was working in one city where it wasn’t considered safe to leave the hotel and wander around at night, she called the Room Service number one night and said, in the most pitiful voice she could muster, “I’m hungry and nothing on the menu looks good tonight. Help me!”

The Room Service voice laughed and said, “Miss Lambden, don’t you worry. After all these months, I know what you like. Let me surprise you.”

In addition to the best steak and the freshest salad ever served by Room Service, the waiter brought a glass of red wine and said, “The chef said to tell you that he knows you don’t like red wine, but this is special. Try it with the steak. Alternate one bite of steak with one sip of wine.”

She still talks about that steak. After that night, she never had to look at the Room Service menu again. When she called, she would say, “Maybe a fish tonight?” or “I’m in the mood for something chocolate.”

Remember, if you are tired of the hotel menu, just imagine how the chef feels.

Since you can’t eat all the time, here are some other ways to fill an evening in a hotel room:

  1. Call your mother.
  2. Read.
  3. Go to a movie.
  4. College libraries are often open late. Learn something.
  5. Work out. Remember the Freshman Fifteen in college? The life of a consultant includes too many meals in restaurants and too few long walks in the park.

If you exercise at home, try to exercise the same way when you are traveling. Find out if it’s safe to walk/run outside near the hotel. This is also a great way to find the neighborhood restaurants and pubs that the travel books don’t know about.

If you exercise in a gym at home, stay in a hotel with a gym and use it. If there is no gym available in the hotel, remember that many national chains have memberships that allow you to work out in any city. Like national hotel and restaurant chains, gyms are a great way to find familiar surroundings in an unfamiliar place.

Exploring new cities is a great way to get exercise and enjoy your time on the road. See the sights. Shop. Ask the people at the hotel and at work what you should be sure to see while you are in town.

We know one consultant who managed, in one year, to see Niagara Falls (working in Buffalo), the Arch in St. Louis, the Napa Valley wine country, six shows on Broadway, and Fort Lauderdale during Spring Break.

Did you know that Kansas City is the City of Fountains? In the winter, the city slowly freezes some of the fountains so you see frozen ice where water flows in the summer. Just beautiful.

Did you know that you can visit the Budweiser Clydesdales at Grant’s Farm in St. Louis? If you think they are fun to watch on Super Bowl commercials, just imagine how magnificent they are up close.

These opportunities may not present themselves again. Don’t spend every evening in your hotel room.

Every city has something unique to offer and the people who live there will be happy to help you discover what is wonderful about their hometown.

Single Life on the Road

The constant-travel lifestyle is often more appealing to single people who do not have a family at home waiting for them each week. For these consultants, the only challenge is finding a way to maintain a home when you aren’t there during the week.

Here are some tips:

  1. Ask a friend or neighbor to pick up your mail once or twice during the week.
  2. Install automatic light timers in your house. Install motion sensor lights outside. This makes it look like someone is home and protects your stuff. (It also makes bats and possums find another yard to live in, but that might just be an Austin thing.)
  3. Hide valuables. Burglars know all about looking in the freezer for your jewelry, but would they think to look in that bag of potting soil in the garage? Hint: Tell someone you trust where you hid them…you’ll remember all the great spots you considered, and you’ll forget the one you picked.
  4. Splurge a little with all that money you are making as a consultant and hire a maid service to come in and clean your house while you are gone. If you have a lawn, hire a yard service, too. The last thing you are going to feel like doing when you finally get home is housework, and you’ll be happier in this job if you don’t feel that you are neglecting chores.
  5. If possible, have a trusted house-sitter stay in your house. Then you won’t have to worry at all.

In addition to maintaining your house, a single person on the road has to maintain a social life. When you are out of town all week, it’s easy to find yourself excluded from your friends’ conversations about plans for the weekend. You have to work harder to maintain those friendships at home, especially if you are also forming new friendships in the city where you are working.

It’s not totally unheard of for consultants assigned to the same client week after week to form friendships, or even romantic attachments, in the city where they work. Having bonds with people all over the country can be a huge advantage professionally because your network is expanded to include all of their colleagues, as well.

Don’t date someone in the client company. This can get messy. (Yeah, we know. Your situation is different. You’ll handle it like grownups. We’d like to believe this, but in our experience it rarely works out that way. Even so, this is still good advice for everyone else.)

Married With Children

Life on the road is harder for those who have a family at home. You miss them and you feel guilty about leaving them behind, and even more guilty when you’re having fun without them.

The same tourist attractions that enliven a single person’s travel can make you miss your family even more. You find yourself thinking, “The kids would love this,” or “Niagara Falls by myself? I don’t think so!”

Here are some tips for making travel easier when you miss your family:

  1. Write long letters saying all the stuff you would have said if you were at home. Buy a fax machine for the house so you can send them before you go to bed and the family can read them with breakfast. (We know. Email works just as well. Except it doesn’t. Handwritten letters mean more. They just do.)
  2. Give the hotel’s fax number to your family or set up a personal e-fax number. Encourage letters from home. Also drawings and report cards and anything else that will make you feel closer. Almost all children could benefit from the occasional writing exercise, and most of them already know how to operate a computer.
  3. Buy a small digital camera or use your cell phone to take pictures and make a “Day in the Life” slide show for the kids. Take pictures of your day from the time you wake up to the time you prepare for bed – pictures of your hotel room, your breakfast plate, your cubicle and co-workers, the bookstore you stop at after work, the restaurants you like – everything! (Trust us, they’ll love it.)

Driving in Strange (translation: “New To You”) Places

Weather conditions and driver courtesy rules vary from city to city. In some cities, driving is a brutal competition, and it’s considered rude or suicidal to slow down for a yellow light. Someone will honk at you or run into you. In others, you’ll get dirty looks if you don’t yield and let a waiting car merge in front of you. On most country roads, failure to wave at passing drivers marks you as an outsider.

No matter where you are, these tips will help lessen the impact of driving during your travels:

  1. Get a map when you arrive. If you know where you are going, you are much less likely to end up in the wrong place.
  2. If you rear-end a car on the freeway, your first move should be to hang up the phone. Better yet, go hands-free when you are driving. Best of all, hang up and drive.
  3. Rent your car from the same agency every week and be extra nice. Usually, the same agents are on duty every Monday morning, so eventually they’ll know you and may offer you the cool convertible or the Jag for a week at no extra charge.
  4. Not every state or city has a “right on red” law. Check with the car rental agency or look for a “No right on red” sign before you assume it’s legal in any intersection where you are.
  5. If you are stopped for speeding, running a red light, driving the wrong way, or, worst of all, hitting something, be very polite to everyone involved. Of course, this is true when you aren’t traveling, too, but you have a better chance of making your meeting or flight if you deal with the situation nicely.

In New York or Boston (or London or Beijing), take a cab or public transportation. Some warnings say “Don’t try this at home.” With regard to driving in these places, the rule is “Don’t try this on the road.” In other words, ask someone at your destination or consult a travel guide to find out whether it’s advisable to drive yourself around.

If you are facing your first winter in a snowy climate, ask someone to teach you how to drive in icy conditions before the first blizzard. You may feel foolish, and they will definitely laugh at you, but the first time you feel your car start to slide, you’ll be glad you did.

For us, just saying “I’m from Texas” is often enough to have our clients offer free driving lessons, icy conditions or not.

Air

Since 9/11, keeping track of the rules for air travel and getting through Security checkpoints has become more of a challenge, but the airlines have made a sincere effort to help.

Every airline and airport website has information about security requirements and how much time will be required to get to your gate. Experienced travelers quickly learn to avoid the busiest times of the day and week. In fact, we don’t know a single traveling consulting who would consider flying on the day before Thanksgiving under any circumstances.

Airport websites will also give you information about other amenities that are available in the terminals. For instance, did you know that the Hong Kong airport has showers and rooms where you can take a nap? After a long flight across the Pacific ocean, a shower is a wonderful way to spend your three-hour layover between connecting flights.

The airport in Portland, Oregon, has a great mall. You can get all your Christmas shopping done between flights and have the items you bought shipped home. Oh, and did we mention that Oregon doesn’t have sales tax?

The San Francisco airport has twenty different museum galleries that rotate art, culture and science exhibitions on a regular schedule. At SFO, you can’t avoid being entertained and educated while you travel.

Here are some other tips for making air travel easier:

  1. When you make your reservations, ask for a seat near the front of the plane. Airlines assign seats back-to-front and families traveling with children tend to plan further ahead than business travelers, so the shrieking three year-olds are usually in the back of the plane.
  2. Always request the Exit Row. Children aren’t permitted, and you get more legroom.
  3. Wear earplugs or invest in some good noise-canceling headphones if you plan to sleep. People talk louder on airplanes.
  4. Planes have only 3% humidity, so you get dehydrated quickly. Carry a bottle of water on board. (This will also keep your feet from swelling.) To keep costs and carryon weight low, carry an empty bottle and ask the flight attendant to fill it for you. On international flights, there is usually a water fountain available for passengers to serve themselves.
  5. When they say, “Limit two carry-on bags,” assume they really mean it and be prepared to check everything but your purse, briefcase and laptop. A good alternative if you are in a hurry is to “gate check” your bags. Especially with smaller commuter flights, this means you get your bags immediately when you get off the plane with no stop at baggage claim.
  6. Pay attention to the safety speech every once in a while. Like washing your car to make it rain, it’s just good karma. We’ve asked, and yes, most flight attendants feel just as silly giving the speech as you do listening to it, but the fact that no one is listening just makes their job harder.
  7. To prevent a stiff neck from sleeping on a plane, ask the flight attendant for a blanket, roll it up and wrap it around your neck before you fall asleep. Your head won’t roll from side-to-side, you won’t snore and you won’t look nearly as ridiculous as those people drooling on their neighbor’s shoulder. They make C-shaped pillows that do this, but that’s just one more thing to carry with you. We prefer to travel light.

While you are traveling, do everything you can to make your life easier. When you are enjoying yourself, you are better prepared to perform at work, and you’ll be more successful.

Cubicles and conference rooms are the same everywhere. The work won’t change, but taking the time to make friends with the people around you, at work and at the hotel, will make all the difference in the world to how well you do it.

Travel Information So Important You Can’t Leave Home Without It

When you travel you not only step out of your comfort zone, but you also leave behind all of the important information about your life. You know, the stuff you’d need in case there were some kind of emergency–insurance numbers, the number to call if you lose your credit card, prescription information, etc.

We have all of this information available to us when we are home, but what would you do if your house sitter contacted you when you were halfway around the world to tell you that your house had caught fire? Could you contact your homeowner’s insurance agent and provide all the information he’d need no matter where you are?

This checklist is designed to help you to compile all the information you should need while away from home so that you can carry it in a portable file. I hope it provides you some peace of mind.

The list includes the items you need and, in parentheses, an explanation about why it is important.

Documents to Place in Your Important Papers File & Why You May Need Them

Make a list with the following information on it:

  • Homeowner’s or Renter’s Policy Number & Agent Contact Number (in case there is an emergency at your home so that you can notify your insurance company as soon as possible)
  • The name, address, contact information, and reservation confirmation numbers for your hotel, rental car and airline tickets (in case you need to contact any of them for any reason or you need the confirmation numbers for any reason)
  • The numbers of and contact information for any credit or debit cards you may use on your trip (in case they are lost or stolen)
  • A copy of your Driver’s License (and International Driver’s License, if necessary-in case either of these documents are lost or stolen)
  • Your frequent flyer number, your frequent guest number for hotel chains, and any other travel membership clubs’ numbers (in case you need them to claim rewards or discounts)
  • The numbers of your traveler’s checks (in case the originals are lost or stolen)
  • Names and contact information for friends and relatives you plan to visit while on your trip (so that it will be easier to contact them and also, in case of emergency, for someone else to be able to contact someone nearby)
  • Medical insurance provider name, contact information and policy number (in case your card is lost or stolen)
  • Name and contact information for your cell phone service provider & the serial number of the phone, your account number, and the SIM card number (in case your phone is lost or stolen or there is a problem with your phone and you are not able to get service)
  • If you will be using a laptop or cell phone with wireless internet access, the name and contact information for your internet service provider, and the serial number of your laptop and any other accessories (in case your computer is lost or stolen and also in case you need assistance with your internet coverage)
  • A copy of your itinerary (Each adult or older child should have a copy of this document in case you get separated from the others in your party. You should also leave a copy of your itinerary with someone at home in case you are lost or missing they can better work with the authorities to help them find you.)
  • Information concerning any medical conditions you may have including allergy information (Include information like blood type, height, weight, birth date, etc. for each member of your party.)
  • Names & contact information for your house sitter, pet sitter, etc. (in case of an emergency)

It could be disastrous if a list like this fell into the wrong hands, so for this reason, use some kind of code as you compile these account numbers.

One suggestion is to write the account numbers in a different sequence. For example, if your account number is 6389 7492 8852 4301 you could write it like this 2588 9836 1043 2947 or if it is 5529731 you could write it as 2551379.

Whatever code you use be sure to memorize it and make sure that anyone else in your traveling party knows how to use it also.

The secret is to have the information available to any one who may need it, but extremely difficult to use for any one who may try to steal it.

Another code to use is to leave the names and contact information in the right order or to further protect yourself and any one else whose contact information you may be carrying, mix up the order of the names and numbers. For example, you could put the info for the first item on the list in the second position, the info for the second item on the list in the third position, and the info for the third item on the list in the first position.

Then create a fake category, something like “Luggage Insurance Carrier” then list the account number as 122331 with the order of the numbers being the “pairs” of how you switched the information: 1,2=first in second position, 2,3=second in third position, 3,1=third in first position.

It may seem a little confusing and like it would be a lot of work to make your list in this way, but remember that the secret it to make the information hard to steal while still having it available just in case you need it.

These items are not sensitive information, but they would be valuable if you needed them:

Keep several various sized envelopes available to store these items safely.

  • The name and contact information of your travel agent (if you used one)
  • Any coupons or discount codes you plan to use
  • The contact information for the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Board for the areas you will be visiting
  • Contact information for the embassy where you will be visiting
  • A copy of your packing list with space to add any purchases you make while on your trip
  • Emergency phone numbers for the areas where you will be traveling including poison control
  • A phrase book for any foreign languages you may encounter
  • Directions to any places or events you plan to visit
  • A tipping chart
  • A foreign currency exchange rate chart
  • If traveling with pets, name & contact information for their veterinarian and also their immunizations history
  • Names and addresses for anyone you plan to send a post card to
  • A journal to keep track of your expenditures and also to keep a record of what you do each day
  • A recent map of the city and surrounding areas where you are visiting
  • Copies of any contracts you signed for vacation packages, travel insurances, etc.
  • Copies of any prescriptions for medications, eye glasses or contact lenses (for each person in your party, if necessary)
  • If traveling with children and only one parent, a notarized letter of consent from the other parent (a separate letter for each child, if necessary; this is good to have even for domestic travel)
  • Immunization records (for each person in your party, if necessary; this is good to have even for domestic travel)
  • The receipts for any merchandise you purchase while on your trip (in case you need to return them for any reason; also, if you are returning from a foreign country you will need these when you pass through customs)
  • A list of all electronic equipment, including serial numbers, that you are traveling with and copies of receipts for them, if possible (in case they are lost or stolen you will have this information available for the authorities; also, if you are passing through customs you will be able to prove prior ownership and avoid paying duty fees on these items)
  • The name and contact information for the hotel(s) where you will be staying (Each person in your party should carry a business card with this information on it in case they are lost or need to give directions to a cab driver.)
  • A copy of your auto insurance information (in case you are involved in an automobile accident)
  • Your luggage claim tickets (to enable you to claim your luggage)
  • The number/aisle of the parking spot where you leave your vehicle in long-term parking at the airport (in case you can’t remember where to find it when you return)
  • Insurance claims forms (for all traveler’s insurance that you purchased; these insurances often have a short claim period so you may need to file the claim before you return home)
  • Birth Certificates (in case you need to prove identity or prove that a child is yours)
  • Extra passport photos (this will save you a lot of time, trouble and expense if your passport is lost or stolen)

Items to carry on your person (You will need these actual documents):

  • Your passport, visa, or any other necessary documents (adults should carry these for the children)
  • Any travel visas or entry documents you need for the areas where you will be traveling (for each person in your party, if necessary)
  • Medical insurance card & any other insurance cards
  • A card with information on any medical conditions and the names and contact information of any other adults in your party or that you may be visiting

Special note about children:

  • Children should carry an identification card stating their full name, your name and the names of any other adults in your party, the phone numbers and addresses where you can be reached, and emergency contact numbers back home.
  • This card should also include any other important information such as medical conditions, insurance information, and health care provider’s name and contact information.
  • Place the ID card inside the child’s shirt in a pocket that you have sewn in beforehand.
  • This will require a little bit of work and preparation, but if it is ever needed it will be worth it.
  • Your child probably already knows about “stranger danger,” but right before a trip is a good time to review this information and to teach them not to show this card to anyone unless they are lost.

Gather all these lists and documents and put then in an accordion style file folder with an elastic band to hold it shut. If you leave your hotel room, place this folder in your room safe and make sure that every one who would need this information knows the combination and knows how to operate the safe.

Hopefully you will never need any of this information for an emergency, but this Important Papers File will be there if you do.

Practical China Travel Information

China travel tips – Useful information

Time difference: During the summertime it’s 7 hours later in China than it is in the UK. During winter time it’s 8 hours later in China.

Best time to travel: The best time to travel is during the months Aprtil through October. However, it’s best to avoid the first week of May and the first week of October. These are Chinese national holidays.

Language: Mandarin Chinese is spoken in most of China. However, countless dialects are also spoken. English is gaining popularity in China, but you still won’t find many people who speak English, especially in rural China. Bring along a Chinese pocket dictionary.

Currency: The official Chinese currency is known as the renminbi (‘peoples money’), RMB for short. The monetary unit is the Yuan. Hong Kong has its own currency – the Hong Kong Dollar. The Hong Kong Dollar is pegged to the American Dollar. It’s accepted in Guangzhou (Canton) and Shenzhen.

Tips: Tipping is customary for guides and drivers. They are generally reliant on tips for a large portion of their salaries. It’s not customary to tip in restaurants.

Visas: You’ll need a Chinese visa in order to travel in China. You’ll have to apply for your own visa at the Chinese Visa Application Service Centre (CVASC). A single entry Chinese visa will cost you around £60. This is made up of a £30 visa fee, and a £30 processing fee.

Telephone calls: Phoning home during your China trip using your mobile usually isn’t a problem, but it can be a very costly affair. Internet Phone (IP) cards are the cheapest way to phone home. You can buy these cards at kiosks and hotels in larger cities. If you want to use your own mobile phone during your trip, it’s best to buy a prepaid sim card at a Chinese phone shop.

Internet: Nearly all parts of China offer Internet access. You’ll find more and more cafés and bars that offer mobile Internet in China.

Photography: The Chinese are usually honoured if you would like to take their picture. Don’t forget to ask their permission first though. Taking pictures or shooting a video at military sites in China is highly illegal. Many museums, palaces and temples also do not allow pictures to be taken or only allow you to take pictures for a fee. It’s best to always be on the look-out for the signs posted regarding photography and to be careful.

Voltage: Electricity in China is 220 Volts, alternating at 50 cycles per second. It’s best to bring along a universal plug adaptor.

Hygiene: Using public bathrooms during your China trip will be quite an experience. The level of hygiene is commonly poor and you’ll have little privacy. Be sure to add toilet paper or tissues, anti-bacterial hand wipes and disinfectant to your China Travel Plan packing list.

How Travel Guides Can Be Beneficial

A well-planned vacation can be so much fun. Traveling can be wonderful especially when doing so with family and/or friends. Quite a number of families usually plan for vacations every year. Many of them prefer to go to unknown destination. This makes them curious and excited at the same time. The vacations are usually planned so that family and/or friends can have time to relax and bond together.

One important thing that is needed when going to an unknown destination is a travel guide. The term ‘travel guide’ can be interpreted as a document that helps people find their way in a certain area or a person who helps tourists find their way in a new country. In this writing, we will look at the documented travel guide i.e. the one that comes in forms of pamphlets and brochures.

The benefits of using documented travel guides are outlined below:

Knowledge of weather patterns – When people are going for vacation, they have to carry the right kind of clothes. This means they have to know the weather that is being experienced at their destination. This will make them pack appropriately. Travel guides usually provide information to travellers regarding the climatic conditions of their destination. They show the various seasons experienced and the periods the seasons last.

Cultural Events – One of the things people desire to see in their destination country is the culture of that country. Thus, the guides usually explain some of the cultural events that take place in that country.

Modes of transport – The guide also suggests some of the modes of transport that can be used by tourists. The guide will recommend the best type of transport when moving from one area to another. If the distance is long, the travellers can use either an airplane or a bus. However, the decision lies with the tourists.

Security and Safety – This is one important thing that is provided in travel guides. People who are going for vacation are advised on safety measures that they can take. Each and every country has its own social evils. Thus, these guides can provide safety measures for travellers.

Recreational Facilities – Travellers usually look forward to enjoy some of the recreational facilities of the country they are going to visit. The guides provide information on hotels and restaurants. They also provide information about other activities that the travellers can enjoy while touring the new destination.

From the above, it can be concluded that having a travel guide is very beneficial for travellers.